Vancouver Special

Description: In this episode of Vancouver Special, we explore the 125th anniversary of Stanley Park, stroll around Vancouver as the most walkable city in Canada and hear about the library Foundation's TOUCH fundraising event supporting the VPL Inspiration Lab. CBC's Ian Hanomansing sets the scene for 2013 as we feature interviews with Vancouver Park Board general manager Malcolm Bromley, author and historian Jean Barman, walking advocate and writer John Atkin, and VPL Foundation directors Paula Shackleton and Susan Knott along with artist and curator Malcolm Levy. Stanley Park is designated a national historic site of Canada, and it's a lush 400-hectare urban forest with a spectacular seawall and numerous famous landmarks. Park Board general manager Malcolm Bromley talks about the park, its 125th anniversary and what draws millions of visitors each year. Jean Barman is a B.C. author who has written numerous acclaimed books on the history of Canada, women and indigenous peoples. Her book Stanley Park's Secret is a City of Vancouver Book Prize winner. Jean shares some of the history of our city's first, largest, and most beloved urban park. He can wear out a pair of walking shoes in just a few months. Author John Atkin has written several books highlighting some of the best walks around Vancouver, which in 2013 was named the most walkable city in Canada, ahead of Toronto and Montreal and just behind New York, San Francisco and Boston on the international scene. He talks about the joy of walking in Vancouver. It was called TOUCH, and it was a dynamic evening of art, literature and technology to support the VPL Inspiration Lab. VPL Foundation directors Paula Shackleton and Susan Knott along with artist and curator Malcolm Levy look back at this exciting event of installations and live performances. And VPL librarian Tim McMillan brings it all together with some great reads you can find at your library about Stanley Park, walking around our city and experiencing some historic photos from VPL's Special Collections department. The theme song is "North Wind" by Vancouver band Lakefield, from the album Sounds from the Treeline.
Type of Resource(s): sound recording-nonmusical
Description: In this episode of Vancouver Special, we’re talking about the year – 2001 – when a little thing called the iPod was launched. That pocket-sized gadget changed a lot and made digital content more accessible than ever. We’re joined by several guests who talk about the shift to digital – for musicians, for libraries and for the entire creative community. CBC's Ian Hanomansing sets the scene for 2001 as we feature interviews with Nettwerk Records co-founder and CEO Terry McBride, two-time Juno Award winner Dan Mangan and VPL chief librarian Sandra Singh. Terry McBride co-founded Nettwerk Records in his apartment in 1984, and since then the Vancouver label has released more than 500 albums selling more than 150 million copies around the world. He talks about those earlier days, and about how digital technology and the VPL Inspiration Lab opened up a world of possibility for creating and sharing. Dan Mangan financed his first album with a loan from a local credit union. Digital technology was always a part of recording his albums, and over the years the technology has become more accessible – with more impact – than ever. Dan talks about his music, his songwriting and how the free VPL Inspiration Lab can help anyone bring creativity to life. Sandra Singh worked as a cybrarian in 2001, when job titles reflected the dot-com enthusiasm of the day – a time when Internet domains sold for millions and dozens of search engines wanted to dominate the ‘information superhighway.’ Sandra is now the chief librarian at VPL and she reflects on some of the profound digital changes that transformed how we access and experience our world. And VPL librarian Tim McMillan brings it all together with some great titles you can find at your library. Hear more about the stories behind Vancouver’s famous music label, a local legendary concert venue and Apple’s iconic design. The theme song is “North Wind” by Vancouver band Lakefield, from the album Sounds from the Treeline.
Type of Resource(s): sound recording-nonmusical
Description: In this episode of Vancouver Special, we’re talking about the year - 2011 - which saw Vancouver Whitecaps enter a new era in their history, becoming the second Canadian team to join Major League Soccer, and the opening of the city's new the Terry Salman Branch at Hillcrest Centre, the former home of the Vancouver Olympic/Paralympic Centre near Nat Bailey Stadium. CBC's Ian Hanomansing sets the scene for 2011 as we feature interviews with Vancouver Whitecaps President Bob Lenarduzzi and VPL Foundation Chair Terry Salman. Bob Lenarduzzi has been involved with Whitecaps for nearly four decades as a player, coach, general manager, director of soccer operations and now president. A champion of the sport and the community, he has received numerous awards, including being inducted into the North American Soccer Hall of Fame and the Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame and receiving an Order of Canada in 2005. Vancouver business leader and library supporter, Terry Salman has served for more than fifteen years as Chair of the Vancouver Public Library Foundation. In recognition of his commitment and longstanding contributions, the Vancouver Public Library board named its newest branch in his honour. Since opening its doors October 2011, the Terry Salman branch remains one of the busiest library branches in the city. And VPL librarian Tim McMillan brings is back to bring it all together with some great reads you can find at your library. The theme song is “North Wind” by Vancouver band Lakefield, from the album Sounds from the Treeline.
Type of Resource(s): sound recording-nonmusical
Description: This episode of Vancouver Special we explore the year - 2002 - with a look back at the launch of Vancouver's first city-wide book club, One Book, One Vancouver. CBC's sets the scene for 2002 and award-winning author Wayson Choy visits us in studio to talk about having his highly acclaimed bestseller selected as One Book, One Vancouver's inaugural title. Popular with readers across the city and beyond, VPL's One Book, One Vancouver was created to promote and encourage a culture of reading and discussion in Vancouver. From 2002 to 2010 the program featured ten amazing books and dozens of imaginative programs – from author readings and neighbourhood walking tours to dinners in the heart of Stanley Park and boxing demonstrations in a regulation-size ring at Library Square – each designed to bring each book's theme's alive. Wayson Choy's first novel, The Jade Peony, spent six months on The Globe and Mail's national bestseller list in 1995 and won the 1996 City of Vancouver Book Award. In 2002, it chosen as the inaugural book for One Book, One Vancouver. And, VPL librarian Tim McMillan brings is back to bring it all together with some great reads you can find at your library. The theme song is “North Wind” by Vancouver band Lakefield, from the album Sounds from the Treeline.
Type of Resource(s): sound recording-nonmusical
Description: In this episode, Vancouver Special takes look back at 2010 - the year that Vancouver hosted the world at the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Join us as CBC's Ian Hanomansing sets the scene for the year and John Furlong, CEO of the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, and Dr. Jack Taunton, Chief Medical Officer for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games, share their memories of this incredible international event. Then, bringing it all together, VPL librarian Tim McMillan is back with some great reads you can find at your library. In February and March of 2010, Vancouver took its place on the world's stage and created an outstanding and memorable experience for athletes, visitors and locals alike. With glowing hearts, thousands of people - athletes, officials, volunteers, artists, visitors and Vancouverites - came together to create a lasting legacy that can still be seen around city today. Filled with memorable moments, the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games are a remarkable and defining part of Vancouver's history and are considered by some to be one of the best Winter Games in the history of the Olympics. The theme song is “North Wind” by Vancouver band Lakefield, from the album Sounds from the Treeline.
Type of Resource(s): sound recording-nonmusical
Description: In this episode, Vancouver Special takes look back at 2009. Co-founder of the Dalai Lama Center for Peace and Education Victor Chan shares his experience organizing the Vancouver Peace Summit and HUB's Colin Stein talks about the opening of Vancouver's Burrard Bridge bike lane. CBC's Ian Hanomansing sets the scene for the year and VPL librarian Tim McMillan is back with some great reads you can find at your library. Victor Chan has known the Dalai Lama for more than forty years and was instrumental in organizing the Vancouver Peace Summit, a three-day conference that provided an intimate forum for the Dalai Lama and other brilliant minds to consider issues of universal responsibility, education and compassion as a foundation for peace. Joining the Dalai Lama at the summit were Nobel Laureates Jody Williams, Mairead Maguire, Betty Williams and Murray Gell-Mann, and numerous highly-respected international leaders from the realms of education, the arts, business, politics and social transformation. More people in Vancouver are choosing cycling as a sustainable and healthy way to get around our city. In the summer of 2009, the City of Vancouver launched a pilot project to make commuting between Kitsilano and the downtown core safer and more bike-friendly by opening a bike only lane on the Burrard Bridge. A year later, the pilot was deemed a big success and, since then millions of cyclists use the lane to cross the bridge each year. The theme song is “North Wind” by Vancouver band Lakefield, from the album Sounds from the Treeline.
Type of Resource(s): sound recording-nonmusical
Description: In this episode, Vancouver Special takes a look at 2003, the year that same-sex couples won the right to legally marry in British Columbia and the opening of InSite, North America’s first and only legal supervised injection site. Vancouver City Councillor and United Church minister Tim Stevenson shares his memories of this pivotal occasion in our city’s history, and Dr. Patricia Daly, Chief Medical Health Officer at Vancouver Coastal Health, talks about the impact InSite has had on our city. CBC's Ian Hanomansing sets the scene for the year and VPL librarian Tim McMillan is back with some great reads you can find at your library. On July 8, 2003, after years of heated discussion and numerous legal battles, the British Columbia Court of Appeal lifted the last restriction on same-sex couples legally marrying in B.C. and the province became the second region in Canada to legalize same-sex marriage. Within an hour of the decision, Antony Porcino and Tom Graff were married by Tim Stevenson just outside of the Vancouver courthouse, becoming the first same-sex couple to be married in B.C. Tim Stevenson is Canada's first openly gay minister and is a long time champion of gay and lesbian rights. He gained international attention when he represented Vancouver at the 2014 Sochi Winter Games, where he met with the IOC to promote the protection of LGBTQ rights in the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Operated by Vancouver Coastal Health and the PHS Community Services Society, InSite plays a key role in the Vancouver's Four Pillars Drug Strategy. Part of a continuum of care for people with addiction, mental illness and HIV and AIDS, the service operates on a on a harm-reduction model. It provides a safe, health-focused supervised environment where people can inject drugs and connect to a variety of addiction, health care and community support services. Since opening its doors in September 2003, this ground-breaking health care service has saved thousands of lives, connecting people to crucial health care services and significantly decreasing overdoses in the vicinity of the site by 35% - compared to a 9% decrease in the city overall. The theme song is “North Wind” by Vancouver band Lakefield, from the album Sounds from the Treeline.
Type of Resource(s): sound recording-nonmusical